Women’s health can be a pain! How research informs acupuncture practice for pain conditions in women’s health | Healthy Seminars

Women’s health can be a pain! How research informs acupuncture practice for pain conditions in women’s health

Women’s health can be a pain! How research informs acupuncture practice for pain conditions in women’s health

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CREDIT HOURS
3.00
COURSE TYPE
Live Online Seminar
DATE
Sunday December 12, 2021 12:30 pm to 4:00 pm PST
SPEAKERS
Claudia Citkovitz, Debra Betts, Kate Levett, Lisa J. Taylor-Swanson
DESCRIPTION
This online lecture brings together recent research information regarding common pain syndromes in women’s health. Deeply rooted in the clinical experience of each of the presenters, this workshop draws together the experience of four researcher-practitioners in women’s health, elucidating current evidence-informed approaches to pain conditions experienced by women. Pain is a complex and subjective experience that is often invisible, and has significant impacts for the sufferer. Research estimates that sufferers of chronic pain are more likely to be women, with women constituting around 70% of people impacted by chronic pain. Women tend to experience pain more consistently and more intensely, implicating underlying biological and hormonal contributions. Women experience some specific and life-stage related pain, including menstrual cycle related pain such as endometriosis, affecting fertility; pregnancy conditions; labour and childbirth; and menopause pain syndromes. Each of these areas is marked by a set of biological and psychosocial factors, for which acupuncture can play an important role in the treatment and management of symptoms and more complex syndromes. Clinical trials highlight areas of effectiveness in treating pain in the context of women’s health. This workshop proposes to discuss the evidence for pain related conditions in women’s health and highlight how some novel findings can be used to inform clinical practice. It should be of interest to researchers and clinicians as well as health care administrators.