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Evidence Based Acupuncture Symposium 2018

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Thank you for offering such a great class. The panelists were amazing and the knowledge shared is so current. So many CEU classes just rehash information learned in school but in order to take TCM to a more professional level we need current research and more professional dialogue. ~ LeahR

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EBA Symposium 2018 - Day 1

Understanding the context of modern healthcare is crucial for operating successfully in modern medicine. The current healthcare climate is creating vast opportunities for the acupuncture profession to play a leading role in improving public health. In order to make the largest positive impact, participants will learn the key forces at play to skillfully navigate the modern healthcare landscape in order to confidently offer and expand their reach.

 

EBA Symposium - Day 1 Lectures:

Acupuncture and the Evolution of Consciousness: Understanding the Modern Scientific Landscape to Improve Healthcare through Better Access to Acupuncture

Mel Hopper Koppelman, DAc, MSc, MSc

 

We live in exciting times with unprecedented levels of opportunity for connection and access to information. Presently, acupuncture is enjoying increasing popularity as more and more patients choose to access it and an increasing number of mainstream institutions offer acupuncture and recommend it. However, the acupuncture profession also faces a number of challenges. On the one hand, energetic critics attempt to convince those who will listen that it doesn’t work while those outside of our profession are adding it to their own practices, sometimes with minimal training. How can we make sense of this landscape? How can we understand these threats and opportunities in a way that allows us to effectively forge a more positive future for public health?

In this talk, we will zoom right on out and start with a very high level overview of the evolution of thought, why different ways of thinking flourish in different times and how we can understand our profession’s way of thinking about healthcare in the context of modern medical science. We will then look at how best to communicate with different individuals and institutions with various types of thinking in order to improve public health and save lives by improving access to acupuncture.

 

Learning Objectives:    

  1. Learn about Spiral Dynamics, a model of the evolution of consciousness, and where acupuncture and scientific research fits into this model
  2. Learn about Integral Theory, its relationship to Daoism, and why Chinese Medicine and Biomedical science view health and medicine differently
  3. Learn to use these models to understand how to more effectively communicate with individuals and institutions at different places on the Spiral of consciousness and development for better healthcare outcomes

 

Authentic Acupuncturation - lessons from the historicity of acupuncture practice in the occident

Dr. Lara McClure Ph.D

 

This is a ‘long view’ of attitudes to Acupuncture. We will explore the import of Acupuncture treatment as a curiosity in 19th c. occidental settings, with particular focus on Churchill’s Treatise on Acupuncturation. We will consider how such documents compare with scientific research published in the 21st c. as trusted sources of evidence and the differences and similarities in the acceptability, scientific and social, of Acupuncture in the two time frames. We will suggest that Acupuncture met the prevailing standards of occidental societies in the 1820s as measured by the personal testimony of the eminent, and contrast how this acceptability is found in the 21st c. by means of the tenets of Evidence-Based Medicine. 

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. To meet Churchill’s Treatise on Acupuncturation and other early-19th texts in their original form and historical context
  2. To contrast this 19th evidence with examples of scientific research into Acupuncture published in the 21stc.
  3. To explore the texture of contemporary attitudes to Acupuncture in both settings
  4. To appreciate this juxtaposition as a source of motivation and inspiration for practitioners of Acupuncture

 

Weaving Evidence and Activism: Lessons from the Popular Movement for Integrative Healthcare

John Weeks

 

The rise of integrative health and medicine is typically presented as a popular, grassroots movement. The January 1993 NEJM publication that propelled the “alternative” and “complementary” toward an “integrative” dialogue between the dominant school and the insurgent products, practices and practitioners was a citizen survey rather than a systematic review of RCTs. Still, forms of scientific evidence had already profoundly shaped the consumer movement while in the shadows, non-recognized, in the “alternative medicine” era. Ground work in the science shaping present policy making relative to mindfulness, multi-modality and non-pharmacological practices was already being laid. And evidence of biomedicine’s glaring gaps was fueling the ardor of the advocates for alternatives. This North America-focused presentation presents 5 Eras in the emergence of the field, highlighting the peculiar interplay of scientific, popular and professional action across multiple stakeholders as the movement advanced. The presentation closes with a look at lessons. When did evidence alone make a difference? When was it evidence plus advocacy? When did evidence merely rationalize directions propelled by other factors? How are evidence and activism interwoven toward expanded access?

 

Learning Objectives

Following this presentation the learners will be able to:

  1. Describe parallel advances of professional formation and new integrative health research.
  2. Explain the conflicting interests and interpretations of the Congressional mandate that created the NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.
  3. Present examples of activism by scientists that potentized their work as instruments for policy change.

 

What can the pharmaceutical industry can teach us about promoting health through acupuncture?

Dr. Gil Barzilay Ph.D Dipl.CM (I.A.TCM, ETCMA)

 

We live in a Western society where the large food and pharmaceutical industry essentially dictate what we consume and how we treat/are being treated for diseases. Pharmaceutical companies have been using various methods to increase awareness to diseases and drugs and create demand for their drugs. These include:

  • Direct & Indirect Physician Training
  • Direct to consumer (patients and families) education
  • Lobbying to Stakeholders, including insurance companies, governing associations, lawmakers etc)

In fact, in 2013 pharma companies spent an estimated $27 Billion USD on marketing in the US only. These include investment in face-to-face detailing, educational & promotional meetings, Continuing Medical Education (CME), mailings, public relations including journal, web and direct-to-consumer ads via social media, awareness campaigns (World “X” Disease Day), grants to Health Advocacy Organizations (HAO) and others.

So what can we learn from this? Acupuncturists tend to be purists, more ethical and less at ease with the word “marketing”. To that we should add the limited budgets. However, existing in a Western society means that to create awareness about the wonders of our profession, we find it helpful to understand the strategies employed by pharmaceutical companies and ethically use these to our advantage.

In this lecture we will be looking at some of the key strategies and tactics, how some of the relevant ones can be adopted to our needs and what we should develop, both as individuals and organizations, to create more positive awareness of our profession and to improve public health through helping acupuncture be a first line treatment where appropriate.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how other healthcare industries promote awareness, access and demand for their products
  2. Understand what we can learn to advance our profession into first line usage, where appropriate
  3. Receive examples and take-home tips

 

EBA Symposium 2018 - Day 2

 

Let’s Get Serious – strategies for winning our place in modern healthcare

Charles Buck

 

The aim of this session is to foster more coherent communication of our brand and to facilitate wider acceptance of professional acupuncture and Chinese medicine. On completion, participants will have gained insight into the cognitive aspects that underlie acceptance of a nascent profession, aspects that lie beyond current definitions of “evidence”. These include issues such as cognitive biases, understanding of belief change as well as evaluation and communication of our traditional explanatory models. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. why the issues are important for the survival of the tradition
  2. How can we justify traditional explanatory models in a world of biomedicine?
  3. Understanding the cognitive biases that inhibit our progress
  4. Understanding belief change and the role of clinicians in facilitating this
  5. Pro-active branding - Brand Us vs Brand ‘acupuncture’/CHM and the need for coherence and credibility

 

The Unfolding of the Vessel:  Evolutionary Biology Perspectives on Human Growth and Development and the Blending of the Eastern and Western Systems.

David W. Miller, MD, LAc

 

Evolutionary Biology presents a phenomenal lens through which to understand the Chinese physiologic systems.  While many concepts in Chinese theory appear to be esoteric and ungrounded in juxtaposition to current understandings of human physiology, shifting our focus to consider the systems in the evolutionary paradigm corrects this.  The Chinese channel system and its basis in somatotopic mapping are well rooted in neurology, and this talk will frame the Chinese system in a way that allows the classic theory to blend with modern understandings.  Our journey from single cell to fully formed adult is structured and predictable, and this talk will argue that the Chinese physiologic systems are invaluable in describing the complex structures that pass from generation to generation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the key neurologic concepts that form the basis for somatotopic mapping
  • Correlate the Chinese channel systems with concepts of somatotopic mapping
  • Recognize the evolutionary persistence of systems presented
  • Frame the Chinese systems in relation to Western neurologic concepts
  • Appreciate the significance of posture as related to emotion and cognition

 

The Efficacy or Effectiveness of Acupuncture: Which Lens Offers Clarity?

Lee Hullender Rubin, DAOM, LAc, FABORM

 

When researchers set out to design a trial and compare acupuncture with a “sham or placebo” needle, very often the trial results in no difference between groups. When acupuncture is compared to usual care or another treatment like physical therapy, for example, we may see acupuncture doing as well as or better than the comparative treatment. Why is this? In this interactive lecture, we will unpack the importance of the control arm and why the question of efficacy versus effectiveness is so important in understanding evidence-based acupuncture.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define how the research question frames a research trial from the outset
  2. Define and describe the sham paradox
  3. Compare and contrast efficacy versus effectiveness

 

Telomeres and your Jing: Secrets to Restoring Health, Fertility and Longevity

Katherine Anderson L.Ac, FABORM

 

Scientists have long known that telomeres influence our aging, but it wasn’t until the recent past that they came to understand why and how they can be activated. This lecture will explore the science behind how telomeres affect general health, fertility and aging and how we can influence that both positively and negatively. We will examine how acupuncture can be used to help regulate telomere activity and thereby increase one’s lifespan and overall health.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the science behind telomeres and their relationship to health, aging and reproduction.
  2. Understand the connection between telomeres and Yang Sheng
  3. Acquire knowledge about regulating telomeres to increase longevity and reproductive capacity with epigenetics and the power of Chinese medicine
  4. Integrate evidence-based practices into your clinic and your life to deliver better patient care and empower patients to improve their health

EBA Symposium 2018 - Day 1

Understanding the context of modern healthcare is crucial for operating successfully in modern medicine. The current healthcare climate is creating vast opportunities for the acupuncture profession to play a leading role in improving public health. In order to make the largest positive impact, participants will learn the key forces at play to skillfully navigate the modern healthcare landscape in order to confidently offer and expand their reach.

 

EBA Symposium - Day 1 Lectures:

Acupuncture and the Evolution of Consciousness: Understanding the Modern Scientific Landscape to Improve Healthcare through Better Access to Acupuncture

Mel Hopper Koppelman, DAc, MSc, MSc

 

We live in exciting times with unprecedented levels of opportunity for connection and access to information. Presently, acupuncture is enjoying increasing popularity as more and more patients choose to access it and an increasing number of mainstream institutions offer acupuncture and recommend it. However, the acupuncture profession also faces a number of challenges. On the one hand, energetic critics attempt to convince those who will listen that it doesn’t work while those outside of our profession are adding it to their own practices, sometimes with minimal training. How can we make sense of this landscape? How can we understand these threats and opportunities in a way that allows us to effectively forge a more positive future for public health?

In this talk, we will zoom right on out and start with a very high level overview of the evolution of thought, why different ways of thinking flourish in different times and how we can understand our profession’s way of thinking about healthcare in the context of modern medical science. We will then look at how best to communicate with different individuals and institutions with various types of thinking in order to improve public health and save lives by improving access to acupuncture.

 

Learning Objectives:    

  1. Learn about Spiral Dynamics, a model of the evolution of consciousness, and where acupuncture and scientific research fits into this model
  2. Learn about Integral Theory, its relationship to Daoism, and why Chinese Medicine and Biomedical science view health and medicine differently
  3. Learn to use these models to understand how to more effectively communicate with individuals and institutions at different places on the Spiral of consciousness and development for better healthcare outcomes

 

Authentic Acupuncturation - lessons from the historicity of acupuncture practice in the occident

Dr. Lara McClure Ph.D

 

This is a ‘long view’ of attitudes to Acupuncture. We will explore the import of Acupuncture treatment as a curiosity in 19th c. occidental settings, with particular focus on Churchill’s Treatise on Acupuncturation. We will consider how such documents compare with scientific research published in the 21st c. as trusted sources of evidence and the differences and similarities in the acceptability, scientific and social, of Acupuncture in the two time frames. We will suggest that Acupuncture met the prevailing standards of occidental societies in the 1820s as measured by the personal testimony of the eminent, and contrast how this acceptability is found in the 21st c. by means of the tenets of Evidence-Based Medicine. 

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. To meet Churchill’s Treatise on Acupuncturation and other early-19th texts in their original form and historical context
  2. To contrast this 19th evidence with examples of scientific research into Acupuncture published in the 21stc.
  3. To explore the texture of contemporary attitudes to Acupuncture in both settings
  4. To appreciate this juxtaposition as a source of motivation and inspiration for practitioners of Acupuncture

 

Weaving Evidence and Activism: Lessons from the Popular Movement for Integrative Healthcare

John Weeks

 

The rise of integrative health and medicine is typically presented as a popular, grassroots movement. The January 1993 NEJM publication that propelled the “alternative” and “complementary” toward an “integrative” dialogue between the dominant school and the insurgent products, practices and practitioners was a citizen survey rather than a systematic review of RCTs. Still, forms of scientific evidence had already profoundly shaped the consumer movement while in the shadows, non-recognized, in the “alternative medicine” era. Ground work in the science shaping present policy making relative to mindfulness, multi-modality and non-pharmacological practices was already being laid. And evidence of biomedicine’s glaring gaps was fueling the ardor of the advocates for alternatives. This North America-focused presentation presents 5 Eras in the emergence of the field, highlighting the peculiar interplay of scientific, popular and professional action across multiple stakeholders as the movement advanced. The presentation closes with a look at lessons. When did evidence alone make a difference? When was it evidence plus advocacy? When did evidence merely rationalize directions propelled by other factors? How are evidence and activism interwoven toward expanded access?

 

Learning Objectives

Following this presentation the learners will be able to:

  1. Describe parallel advances of professional formation and new integrative health research.
  2. Explain the conflicting interests and interpretations of the Congressional mandate that created the NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.
  3. Present examples of activism by scientists that potentized their work as instruments for policy change.

 

What can the pharmaceutical industry can teach us about promoting health through acupuncture?

Dr. Gil Barzilay Ph.D Dipl.CM (I.A.TCM, ETCMA)

 

We live in a Western society where the large food and pharmaceutical industry essentially dictate what we consume and how we treat/are being treated for diseases. Pharmaceutical companies have been using various methods to increase awareness to diseases and drugs and create demand for their drugs. These include:

  • Direct & Indirect Physician Training
  • Direct to consumer (patients and families) education
  • Lobbying to Stakeholders, including insurance companies, governing associations, lawmakers etc)

In fact, in 2013 pharma companies spent an estimated $27 Billion USD on marketing in the US only. These include investment in face-to-face detailing, educational & promotional meetings, Continuing Medical Education (CME), mailings, public relations including journal, web and direct-to-consumer ads via social media, awareness campaigns (World “X” Disease Day), grants to Health Advocacy Organizations (HAO) and others.

So what can we learn from this? Acupuncturists tend to be purists, more ethical and less at ease with the word “marketing”. To that we should add the limited budgets. However, existing in a Western society means that to create awareness about the wonders of our profession, we find it helpful to understand the strategies employed by pharmaceutical companies and ethically use these to our advantage.

In this lecture we will be looking at some of the key strategies and tactics, how some of the relevant ones can be adopted to our needs and what we should develop, both as individuals and organizations, to create more positive awareness of our profession and to improve public health through helping acupuncture be a first line treatment where appropriate.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how other healthcare industries promote awareness, access and demand for their products
  2. Understand what we can learn to advance our profession into first line usage, where appropriate
  3. Receive examples and take-home tips

 

EBA Symposium 2018 - Day 2

 

Let’s Get Serious – strategies for winning our place in modern healthcare

Charles Buck

 

The aim of this session is to foster more coherent communication of our brand and to facilitate wider acceptance of professional acupuncture and Chinese medicine. On completion, participants will have gained insight into the cognitive aspects that underlie acceptance of a nascent profession, aspects that lie beyond current definitions of “evidence”. These include issues such as cognitive biases, understanding of belief change as well as evaluation and communication of our traditional explanatory models. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. why the issues are important for the survival of the tradition
  2. How can we justify traditional explanatory models in a world of biomedicine?
  3. Understanding the cognitive biases that inhibit our progress
  4. Understanding belief change and the role of clinicians in facilitating this
  5. Pro-active branding - Brand Us vs Brand ‘acupuncture’/CHM and the need for coherence and credibility

 

The Unfolding of the Vessel:  Evolutionary Biology Perspectives on Human Growth and Development and the Blending of the Eastern and Western Systems.

David W. Miller, MD, LAc

 

Evolutionary Biology presents a phenomenal lens through which to understand the Chinese physiologic systems.  While many concepts in Chinese theory appear to be esoteric and ungrounded in juxtaposition to current understandings of human physiology, shifting our focus to consider the systems in the evolutionary paradigm corrects this.  The Chinese channel system and its basis in somatotopic mapping are well rooted in neurology, and this talk will frame the Chinese system in a way that allows the classic theory to blend with modern understandings.  Our journey from single cell to fully formed adult is structured and predictable, and this talk will argue that the Chinese physiologic systems are invaluable in describing the complex structures that pass from generation to generation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the key neurologic concepts that form the basis for somatotopic mapping
  • Correlate the Chinese channel systems with concepts of somatotopic mapping
  • Recognize the evolutionary persistence of systems presented
  • Frame the Chinese systems in relation to Western neurologic concepts
  • Appreciate the significance of posture as related to emotion and cognition

 

The Efficacy or Effectiveness of Acupuncture: Which Lens Offers Clarity?

Lee Hullender Rubin, DAOM, LAc, FABORM

 

When researchers set out to design a trial and compare acupuncture with a “sham or placebo” needle, very often the trial results in no difference between groups. When acupuncture is compared to usual care or another treatment like physical therapy, for example, we may see acupuncture doing as well as or better than the comparative treatment. Why is this? In this interactive lecture, we will unpack the importance of the control arm and why the question of efficacy versus effectiveness is so important in understanding evidence-based acupuncture.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define how the research question frames a research trial from the outset
  2. Define and describe the sham paradox
  3. Compare and contrast efficacy versus effectiveness

 

Telomeres and your Jing: Secrets to Restoring Health, Fertility and Longevity

Katherine Anderson L.Ac, FABORM

 

Scientists have long known that telomeres influence our aging, but it wasn’t until the recent past that they came to understand why and how they can be activated. This lecture will explore the science behind how telomeres affect general health, fertility and aging and how we can influence that both positively and negatively. We will examine how acupuncture can be used to help regulate telomere activity and thereby increase one’s lifespan and overall health.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the science behind telomeres and their relationship to health, aging and reproduction.
  2. Understand the connection between telomeres and Yang Sheng
  3. Acquire knowledge about regulating telomeres to increase longevity and reproductive capacity with epigenetics and the power of Chinese medicine
  4. Integrate evidence-based practices into your clinic and your life to deliver better patient care and empower patients to improve their health

Mel Hopper Koppelman is the Executive Director of Evidence Based Acupuncture, a non-profit organisation dedicated to improving public health through better information about acupuncture’s considerable evidence base. Mel completed her MSc in Acupuncture from the Northern College of Acupuncture in York, UK in 2012 and a second MSc in Nutrition and Functional Medicine from the University of Western States in Portland, Oregon, USA in 2015. She is a reviewer for a number of peer-reviewed medical journals and has published numerous articles about acupuncture research. Mel is a research supervisor and guest lecturer at the Northern College of Acupuncture Masters programme in York, UK. Her blog, abetterwaytohealth.com, provides readers with informative analysis of acupuncture research and evidence based medicine. She practices acupuncture and functional medicine in Rhode Island, USA.

Dr. Barzilay has a Diploma in Chinese Medicine (Dipl. CM, I.A.TCM) with distinction from Broshim College of Integrative Medicine, Tel Aviv University, where he studied both Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine. In addition, he has completed a 1-year specialty course in "Chinese & Macrobiotics Nutrition (TEF Method)" with Eyal Shpringer.

Dr. Barzilay works in his clinic in central Tel Aviv and in "Refuot", one of the leading CAM Clinics in Israel. He also teaches "Chinese Medicine Research" for 3rd and 4th Year students in Broshim College where he also supervises the students' final year Research Projects. In addition, he is an assistant in the "Acupuncture Techniques" course for 2nd year students.

Dr. Barzilay is also part of the International Community of Chinese Medicine (ICCM) Organization Core Team and leads ICCM's Marketing & International Relations, as well as being in charge of the ICCM Science & Research Day. He writes regularly research reviews & newsletters for Broshim, ICCM and other organizations (Facebook: drgiltcm).

Before studying Chinese Medicine, Dr. Barzilay worked in Teva Pharmaceuticals, leading Global Marketing for the Innovative Multiple Sclerosis business (Copaxone©) with sales over $4 Billion.

Dr. Barzilay has a B.Sc (Honors) from Imperial College, University of London, a Ph.D from Oxford University in Cancer Research and a European Medical Biology Organization (EMBO) Post-Doctoral fellowship at the Weizmann Institute, specializing in Cell Death (Apoptosis) research.

John Weeks has worked in integrative health for 35 years as an organizer, chronicler, speaker, and executive. His Integrator Blog News & Reports and related columns are top interprofessional resources on policy and organizational developments. He presently serves as editor in chief of JACM: Paradigm, Practice and Policy Advancing Integrative Medicine (The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine), the Official Journal of the Society for Acupuncture Research. He has highlighted and examined the acupuncture Medicaid pilots and UK’s NICE guidelines policy disputes over recognition of acupuncture.

Weeks has consulted with the NIH, numerous professional and academic organizations, and for the WHO/PAHO on traditional medicine strategies. His organizing includes helping co-found the Integrative Health Policy Consortium and co-founding and directing the Academic Collaborative for Integrative Health. Weeks attended Stanford University for three years. Four academic institutions have granted him honorary doctorates. His spouse and closest partner in this life work is integrative physician Jeana Kimball, ND, MPH. They have two grown children. He takes pride in having worked out of home offices in Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Rincon, Puerto Rico for 6 of the past 15 years. He loves stand-up paddle-boarding and surfs on it when he has the chance.

Lara McClure BA(Cantab) MA(Cantab) PhD PGCHE is Course Director for the Acupuncture BSc and MSc courses at the Northern College of Acupuncture in York, UK. She teaches Research on these courses and on the NCA’s Chinese Herbal Medicine MSc. Lara has completed a Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education with Middlesex University and is an External Examiner for Westminster University.

Charles is an experienced practitioner, educator and recognised authority on Chinese medicine. His career has spanned multiple disciplines including medical sciences and the theory and practice of clinical oriental medicine. Conducting brain research at university in the 1970’s Charles stumbled across work on the neuro-physiology of acupuncture. Already interested in sinology, he completed the training at ICOM (UK) under Dr van Buren where the emphasis was on Daoist and Classical styles. Graduating in 1984 he then helped pioneer the teaching and practice of Chinese herbal medicine in the UK including a role as the founding director of the UK’s first college-based CHM course. Awarded a university acupuncture MSc (distinction) in 2000, he has worked both as a supervisor and External Examiner for various University TCM higher degrees. Clinically Charles has gained specialist skills in fertility, cancer care and dermatology and for 25 years has taught these and other subjects extensively across the EU. In 2014, he published a textbook on the historical development of Chinese medicine. Wishing to be maximally effective as a practitioner, educator and author he gained the skills required for effective communication; self-studying PR, behavioural sciences and taking a formal training in NLP in 2000 and 2002. Well-placed to contribute to the advancement of our profession Charles accepted a call to serve the British Acupuncture Council, the EU’s largest and most mature acupuncture body, and completed a 3-year term as Chairman of its Governing Board in 2015. Acting politically in the UK and EU he has seen some important achievements during this time. Charles is now working on the Board of the Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine (UK), the ATCM (Chinese) and the US-based Acupuncture Now Foundation, to raise awareness of the contribution professional TCM can make to healthcare today. With Matthew Bauer he is currently co-directs an initiative to coordinate PR and educational affairs between the US and EU.

Dr. David W. Miller, MD, LAc is one of the only MD physicians in the U.S. dually board certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). Dr. Miller received his Bachelor’s degree in Theoretical Mathematics from Vassar College, his M.D. from the Brown University School of Medicine, and completed his internship and residency in Pediatrics at the University of Chicago. He then completed his Master of Science in Traditional Oriental Medicine with the Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in Chicago.

Dr. Miller is currently in private practice with East-West Integrated Medicine, but is also an instructor at the Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in Chicago where he designed the school’s Integrative Pediatrics curriculum. At Pacific College, he has also designed and taught curriculum for the study of Integrative Endocrinology, Nephrology, Public Health, and Medical Communications. Dr. Miller sees all ages in his practices, but specializes in Pediatrics seeing patients from newborn to adulthood.

Dr. Miller is also involved with organized medicine and medical legislation, and is the chair of the American Society of Acupuncturists, president of the Illinois Acupuncture Federation, Legislative Director for the Illinois Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, and sits on the Illinois Board of Acupuncture with Department of Financial and Professional Regulation. He is a subject matter expert and chair of the Biomedical Examination Committee for the NCCAOM, and is a peer reviewer for Meridians: The Journal of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. He is a member of the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture, the National Physicians Alliance, the American Medical Association, the Illinois State Medical Society, and the Chicago Medical Society as well, and sits on the ISMS Council on Education and Health Workforce. Dr. Miller also participates in the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Complementary and Integrative Medicine.

Katherine Alexander Anderson, MBA, DACM, L.Ac. FABORM, is the current President of the American Board of Oriental Reproductive Medicine (ABORM), and is leading the organization to ensure patients worldwide receive care from the most highly skilled practitioners. With over 20-years experience in the healthcare industry including long term and sub-acute care and diagnostic laboratory clinical operations, Katherine has been on the forefront of delivering quality patient care for decades. Nationally board certified in acupuncture and oriental medicine and having worked extensively in western medicine, Katherine understands an integrated approach to healthcare. She has clinics in Maine and New Hampshire and has dedicated her practice exclusively to reproductive issues and women’s health.

She completed her Chinese medical school training at the New England School of Acupuncture where she studied Chinese acupuncture, Japanese acupuncture, and Chinese herbal medicine. She is board certified in acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine (Dipl.OM) by the National Commission for the Certification of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). She obtained her Bachelor of Science degree in Health Management and a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from the University of New Hampshire. She completed her clinical doctoral studies at the Pacific College of Oriental Medicine and is a PhD candidate with Shulan College and Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine. She is conducting research on the effects of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine on infertility and menstrual cycles. She is an international speaker and is passionate in educating women about the benefits of Chinese medicine and its profound effects on their cycles and overall health.

Lee Hullender Rubin, DAOM, LAc, FABORM, is a clinician, international academic, and published researcher specializing in reproductive medicine, women's health, and female sexual pain. She graduated with her Master of Science degree from Bastyr University and her Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine from the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine (OCOM). With more than 14 years experience, she spent more than 5 years managing an acupuncture program at a western fertility clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Dr. Hullender Rubin was the first OCOM postdoctoral research fellow funded by a National Institutes of Health educational grant. Her most recent publication is the first study to report an increase in birth outcomes associated with the addition of Traditional Chinese Medicine to In Vitro Fertilization. She was recently awarded a National Vulvodynia Association grant to investigate the feasibility of acupuncture and lidocaine to treat chronic vulvar pain. She is on the faculty at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine, American College of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, and New Zealand School of Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Visiting Research Faculty at the Oregon Health and Science University. Dr. Hullender Rubin currently resides in Portland, Oregon, and practices at the Portland Acupuncture Studio (www.pdxacustudio.com)

The Evidence Based Acupuncture (EBA) is run by volunteers and leaders all over the world who see a central role for acupuncture in the future of medicine and know that this won’t happen on its own, that we must work together with creativity and compassion to make it so. A big part of this goal is about empowering acupuncture practitioners who are fascinated by science and the human body to feel congruent and confident in the context of modern healthcare with the right tools and understanding.



$300.00 USD

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Course Reviews

This was one of THE BEST seminars EVER! ~ MF

Thank you for offering such a great class. The panelists were amazing and the knowledge shared is so current. So many CEU classes just rehash information learned in school but in order to take TCM to a more professional level we need current research and more professional dialogue. ~ LeahR

Thank you to the EBA team for a great event and experience! The whole thing was very well coordinated as well as having a dynamic line-up. Looking forward to the next event! ~ American Society of Acupuncturists